Guatemalan Girls’ Futures Out of Focus–Until Now

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Education is something many of us, sadly, take for granted. If you’re reading this story, you’re more educated than the 775 million adults, and many more children, around the globe who can’t read or write. And that means you have more opportunities to continue learning, to get a good job, to improve your own life and the lives of those around you.

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Girls’ Voices is a GreaterGood.org program focused on engaging girls everywhere to use digital media to communicate their strength, resilience, and potential. It started this August in Panajachel, Guatemala. Nine young ladies and their respective video cameras are now sharing their stories with the world, working, getting an education, and moving forward toward a brighter future.

Using their videography skills, the girls are empowered to speak up for themselves and to raise funds, 100% of which will become secondary education scholarships for girls who could not otherwise get an education because of the financial barriers they and their families face.

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Each girl has an amazing story and a big dream, such as becoming a business owner, a filmmaker, or a nurse, or teaching other women in her community how to read and write. They want to help take care of their families and lift themselves and their people from poverty through the power of education.

Below is a video made by a young girl named Ana Maria, sharing what her life is like and what her goals are. All of the girls have different stories to tell. Scroll down and click “Next” to be introduced to each of them.

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Learn more about Ana Maria and meet all 9 girls being helped by this program on the next page!

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Elizabeth Nelson is a wordsmith, an alumna of Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, a four-leaf-clover finder, and a grammar connoisseur. She has lived in west Michigan since age four but loves to travel to new (and old) places. In her free time, she. . . wait, what’s free time?